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Lalita Ramakrishnan elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences .

last modified Apr 30, 2015 03:26 PM
Professor Lalita Ramakrishnan announced as one of 84 new members of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences.

The National Academy of Sciences has announced the election of 84 new members and 21 foreign associates from 15 countries in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.

Lalita Ramakrishnan is a Professor of immunology and infectious diseases at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in the Department of Medicine. Her research is focused on understanding the pathogenesis of tuberculosis and the basis of vastly different susceptibilities to this disease.

Those elected today bring the total number of active members to 2,250 and the total number of foreign associates to 452. Foreign associates are nonvoting members of the Academy, with citizenship outside the United States.

The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit institution that was established under a congressional charter signed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863. It recognises achievement in science by election to membership, and – with the National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council – provides science, technology, and health policy advice to the federal government and other organisations.

Upcoming events

Cambridge Parasitic and Neglected Tropical Diseases Network Day

Dec 13, 2018

Lecture Theatre, Department of Pathology, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP

Immunogenomics of Disease: Accelerating to Patient Benefit

Feb 05, 2019

Wellcome Genome Campus, UK

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The new Capella building- CITIID

See the home of CITIID being built in this fantastic time-lapse video. From basement to water tight in 17 months. The Capella building will be finished in 2018.

Fibroblast

‘Fibroblast’ has been developed from a conversation between Harold Offeh and Dr Alice Denton, a scientist based at the Babraham Institute and a member of the Cambridge Immunology Network. Offeh was particularly interested in the character and roles played by particular cells in the immune system, as well as the immune system’s role as a primary source of protection and care. The film takes as a starting point microscopic images of broblast cells, an area of research for Dr Denton.

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